Batman Day honors 75 years of the Dark Knight

Batman Day honors 75 years of the Dark Knight

BATMAN:This image provided by Heritage Auctions shows a copy of "Batman" No. 1 from 1940, depicting Batman and Robin swinging in front of a Gotham city skyline. A similar copy sold for $850,000 in 2012. Photo: Associated Press

DC Comics will celebrate 75 years of Gotham’s top crime-fighter on July 23 with a national holiday.

Batman Day will feature free give-a-ways of a new “Batman” comic book.

Book stores, comic shops, and libraries will give away special editions of “Detective Comics #27.”

EXPLORE: Highlights from 75 years of the Caped Crusader | EXTRA: Find a participating Batman Day book storePrint your own Batman masks

Barnes & Noble is among retailers participating in the nationwide promotion, according to DC Comics.

The limited edition features stories by Brad Meltzer, Scott Snyder, Bryan Hitch and Sean Murphy, as well as Batman’s first adventure, Bob Kane and Bill Finger’s “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” which originally debuted in 1939.

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